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Seeing Red

  • Seeing Red
  • Seeing Red
     
  • Seeing Red
  • Seeing Red
  • Seeing Red

Seeing Red is a performance piece initiated and directed by Takayuki Fujimoto, choreographed by Jung Young Doo, with scenography by Megumi Matsubara.

The title is taken from Nicholas Humphrey’s book that explores the sensation created by the act of seeing red. What’s involved in “seeing red”? “Consciousness matters,” Humphrey concludes with striking paradox, “because it is its function to matter. It has been designed to create in human beings a Self whose life is worth pursuing.” Deeply inspired by this paradox, the performance piece challenges the very act of “seeing”. Through exploring the act of “seeing red”, we challenge our consciousness with which we create a Self in us as a basis of human value that connects with other selves.

Megumi Matsubara is known for her obsessively accurate use of shadows and reflections in her architectural approach. She orchestrates immaterial elements produced by light. With Seeing Red being the first stage that Matsubara ever worked on, she naturally ignored many constraints that stages normally require. Abstract, minimal, yet extremely vibrant in responding to lights programmed by Fujimoto, her stage set only focuses on the series of phenomena it creates.

The scenography consists of installations of self-standing triangular prisms made of mirrors, as well as translucent screens; one screen being a noise control curtain used for building sites, another being a special PVC, specifically developed for professional projection use. The stage is divided into two layers by those two screens, upon each of which moving images are projected. Responding to the effect of light and projection, spaces behind the screens emerge and disappear, creating eclectic illusory effects. The triangle pillars made of mirrors reflect light towards all directions in accordance with the movement of light, at times stretching the stage to the audience seats. The perception of the space changes from a moment to another and from one angle to another, offering an experience undeniably unique to each audience.


 

Scenography | Megumi Matsubara, Tokyo, Japan 
Location | KAAT Kanagawa Arts Theatre, Yokohama, Japan
Technical info | PVC curtains
Picture credits | Megumi Matsubara, Bozzo