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Bad Cafe

  • Bad Cafe
  • Bad Cafe
     
  • Bad Cafe
  • Bad Cafe
  • Bad Cafe

Mumbai-based architecture studio, Nudes, has designed the façade of the Bad Café developing a flexible, undulating and thoroughly modern exterior for the multi-purpose location.

Remotely located from traffic snarls and insulated from typically high levels of air and sound pollution, the project is sheathed in tranquillity and peace.

The dynamic skin, all of 25,992 black PVC cylindrical conduits grafted into CNCd aluminium composite box panels with acupuncture-like precision, shares a peaceful co-existence with its neighbours, its presence gradually unveiled as one meanders through the narrow by-lanes of the historical urban fabric.

The bristling surface of the building is inspired by the anatomical make-up of human skin, and its function as a connector between human bodies. The human skin is an anatomical barrier in bodily defence from pathogens and damage between the internal and external environment. It also contains nerve endings that react to touch, pressure, vibration, tissue injury, heat and cold. Furthermore, the PVC pipes are recycled and are therefore environment-friendly.

Designed as a tactile, sensory experience the project harbours a range of hybrid activities. Light travels down each individual tube with surprising ease, creating a bright, calming interior space.

The striking black and white aesthetic of the bad café continues inside, where Nudes focuses on rough, tactile, ‘true-to-material’ textures, generating a sparse and simple design.

The architectural component was designed to facilitate yoga, gastronomical experiences, and cultural event-spaces for music, art, performances, intellectual discourse and fashion. These activities are stacked vertically over three levels, including an open-to-sky terrace courtyard.


 

Architects | Nudes, Mumbai, India 
Location | Mumbai, India
Technical info | Recycled PVC electrical conduits
Picture credits | Sameer Chawda